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Just had to share

 

If you have a long face:
“The direction of the light can change the shape of a person’s face. If the light is coming from above the camera, it will make the face appear fuller,” suggests Kessler.

If you have a wide or round face:
“To slim out a rounder face, use light coming from the side and slightly above.”

If you think you look heavy on camera:
“A wide angle lens will make a person appear heavier, and a telephoto lens will have a slimming effect,” Kessler says. Telephoto it is!

If you want smooth-looking skin:
“The closer and larger the light source is, the softer and more flattering the light will be,” says Kessler. And avoid red backgrounds: “Very few people look good on a red background — it brings out the redness in skin.”

If you have dark circles:
“Use the flash — even in daylight. If you’re shooting in mid-day sun from above, the flash will fill in under the eyes. Also, try using a white or silver reflector card to bounce light back to the face, removing any shadows under the eyes,” says Kessler.

If you’re on the pale side:
“A warming filter such as an 81A placed on the camera lens (or added later in Photoshop) will give any skin type a healthy glow.”

If you want to shoot outdoors:
“Try shooting in the shade on sunny days, and embrace the beautiful soft light of an overcast day. The clouds diffuse the sun, making it a larger and softer light source,” says Kessler. Another trick? “Shoot during the magic hour: either one hour after sunrise or one hour before sunset — lighting is ideal then to give a gorgeous glow to your skin.”

If you want to look natural:
Many times posing for photos, especially a portrait, can look forced and stiff. “The most important thing is to feel comfortable and relaxed,” says Kessler. He suggests striking up a conversation with your photographer so that you have the same easygoing facial expressions you normally do, and feel at east in the situation.

And a few additional beauty and fashion tips from Kevin Mancuso, celebrity stylist and Nexxus Creative Director:

  • Get a trim a week within a week of the shoot so your hair looks healthy.
  • Make sure your roots are touched-up, as they can stick out in photos, even black and white.
  • Drape hair in front of your shoulders to help elongate the face and make you look thinner — tightly pulled-back hair can look harsh and unapproachable.
  • Pick clothing that works with your hairstyle — big collars will look busy if you wear your hair down, and low-cut shirts won’t work well with an up-do. It’s all about balance, so stick to a simple crew or v-neck.

 

I got this info off of On Stylist from photographer Josh Kessler

    How To Create Your Own Portrait Backdrop

    How To Create Your Own Portrait Backdrop
    By Corry at Sun, 2006-01-22 22:35

    What’s the point of dropping tons of money on a backdrop, when you can make your own for a fraction of the price?

    I did it…here’s how.

    First, supplies. Most important, I needed the material. I bought a large 10’X20’ piece of unbleached muslin from Joanne Fabrics. There are lots of fabric dyes you can use to create your backdrops, but I chose to use Rit Dye.
    <img width=”165″ height=”145″ src=”http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v239/core_17/RitDye.jpg&#8221; />
    I will explain the actual process later.

    Next, I needed a way to hang the backdrop. At the

    hardware store I bought a set of curtain hangers like this:</p>
     <img src=”http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v239/core_17/curtainhk.jpg&#8221; />
    <p align=”left”>…and a 12’ piece of banister wood (the stuff they use for stair rails) like this:</p>
    <img width=”330″ height=”248″ src=”http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v239/core_17/banister.jpg&#8221; />
    Also, for the dyeing process, I used a large un-used plastic trash can and a wooden dowel rod about 3 feet long.

    Now, the process. First, I prepared the fabric. I hemmed the edges so they wouldn’t fray. The top (one of the 10’ edges), I had to sew a loop big enough to slide over the banister rail (kind of like a curtain on a curtain rod). It helps when you have a mom with a sewing machine and too much free time!

    Next, on to dyeing. Prepare your solution as directed on the package. For the color and look I wanted, I chose to use one part Black dye to two parts Pearl Grey. On the directions, it says to stir constantly to achieve a solid color. I did not want a solid color, so I would stir for a minute or two, let it sit for a minute or two, stir, let sit, etc. Once it is dyed to the

    color you want it, the fabric must be rinsed until the water runs clear. Then, just pop it in the dryer or hang it up to air dry.

    While the fabric dries, it’s time to prepare to hang it on the wall. Take your curtain hooks and screw them into the wall about 11’ apart, at a height you find appropriate. I have mine at 8’, though if ceiling clearance allows, 9’ might be better.

    Slide the loop of  your muslin over the banister rail until there is about a foot of banister showing at each end. Here is how it should look.   Though more clearance is preferred to hang off the end of the hook, in my case it wasn’t possible. 

    <img width=”600″ height=”400″ src=”http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v239/core_17/BanisterAndHooks.jpg&#8221; />
    And…you are done! When you are done doing your shoot, you merely roll the backdrop up onto the rail. A tip: when you unroll it again, it will be wrinkly. Keep a small spray bottle with water in it, and spray the wrinkles til they are damp. Pull the wrinkles taut a few times, and leave it to dry. Most of the time, it will dry smooth, though sometimes you have to repeat the process. 

    In the end, here were my results.
    <p align=”left”><img width=”500″ height=”750″ src=”http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v239/core_17/Kittyonstool.jpg&#8221; /> </p>
    <p align=”left”>&nbsp; <img width=”500″ height=”790″ src=”http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v239/core_17/ErikPractice.jpg&#8221; /> </p>
    <p align=”left”>&nbsp; <img width=”450″ height=”675″ src=”http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v239/core_17/005SMALL.jpg&#8221; /> </p>

    Sunday April 10, 2011 there is a Kite Festival in Pearson Park Maryville, TN. from 10am-4pm.

    Going to go check it out might be some cool photographs there to be taken. Do you know of something going on in the area? If so, post it lets see if we can’t get people out there taking some photos. Feel free to also post a pic or two of where you went this week. I am going to start trying to post events going on in the local area at least once a week. How about a helping hand with this everyone, join in and let’s get out there.

    Photoshop

    Even though I am starting to pick up a few things in Photoshop I feel I’m not where I need to be with it. Here is a link to a site that has helped me maybe it can help you as well.http://help.adobe.com/en_US/Photoshop/11.0/WSfd1234e1c4b69f30ea53e41001031ab64-760ca.html

    Art At The Airport

    We were very pleased to find out yesterday that Tammy & I were chosen to have two of our photographs displayed at the Arts in the Airport Spring 2011 Exhibition. To see all the artworks that were chosen click the link. https://picasaweb.google.com/knoxalliance/Spring2011final#.

    There were over 500 entries from over 130 artists. Only 47 were chosen and Tammy & I are very happy to be among those few.

    THIS IS AN UP – DATE:  Recently found out that Sarah Busby @ SarahBusbyPhotography.wordpress.com and John Edwin May @ JohnEMay.net or JEMay@PSCC  were also among the exhibits artist. Congratulations to all that made it into the exhibit.

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    The two images are the ones chosen for the exhibit.

    Something Different

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    Senior 2011

    This is one of the senior photo shoots we just finished with recently. The family was great and we all had a lot of fun.

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